The official website features a surprising team record. The Padres’ most home runs are Colbert.

Most of the team records are occupied by well-known players. Hank Aaron for the Braves, Willie Mays for the Giants, Tom Seaver for the Mets, and so on. For example, no one would be in trouble if asked to win the Cardinals’ most winning pitcher (the correct answer is Bob Gibson). However, there are cases where an unexpected player has set a team record. Anthony Castro, a reporter on the official Major League Baseball website, has introduced such an “unexpected team record.”

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Reporter Castrobins selected Nate Colbert as the “most surprising team record”, which has the most home runs in the Padres (163). Phil Nevin was traded with seven more to line up with Colbert, Adrian Gonzalez with two more, and Dave Winfield left the team with nine more FAs. “It’s as if the Padres are trying to keep this record,” said Castrobins. By the way, if you apply Colbert’s record to the rankings of the other three teams that were born in 1969, the same as the Padres, you will be ranked 7th in the Royals and Expos and 10th in the Brewers.

Jim Slayton, who holds the record for the most wins in the Brewers (117 wins), has 121 losses, the most in the history of the team. Slayton is the only pitcher with the most wins in 30 teams, with Kuroboshi leading. In addition, Rickey Henderson recorded 42 athletics season’s most stolen base deaths in 1982. Henderson marked the highest season of 130 stolen bases this year, with a stolen base success rate of 75.6%, one of the lowest in his career. In addition, Jason Jennings and Ubaldo Jimenez have the most shutout records for the Rockies. It can be said that the record of only 3 shutouts and the largest number in the history of the baseball team is unique to the Rockies based in “Batter’s Heaven” Coors Field.

Retired from Seager “I knew I would say goodbye to baseball in the final round of the season.”

On October 3rd (local time), the Mariners, who had the potential to advance to the postseason, fought the final match of the season against the Angels at the overcrowded home of T-Mobile Park. The game was inferior from the beginning, and Kyle Seager, who had been in the starting lineup at “4th and 3rd base”, was replaced in the middle of the 9th inning. He retired to the bench with great cheers. At this time, few must have noticed that Seger could never be seen playing as a major leaguer. However, knowing that Seger himself would be the last active game, he was in the final round of the season.

Seger, who announced that he would retire from active duty only this season, told reporter Ryan Divish of the local newspaper “Seattle Times” that he knew that he would say goodbye to baseball at that time (= the final game of this season). I knew that if I didn’t advance to the postseason, it would be my last chance to play baseball. The last at bat, the last chance, the last inning. That was in my mind. ” “There were so many emotions swirling that day. It was magical that my family came out at the opening ceremony before the game. That day became emotional at a very early stage,” he said. I looked back on the last day of my life.

“I really wanted to win to break through this situation (which I said I didn’t make to the last postseason in 2001) and get something that fans couldn’t see for a long time,” he said. He also talked about his feelings. It was before the start of the season that his idea of ​​retirement first came to mind. He knew that the team option was unlikely to be exercised and knew that it would be his last season to play for the Mariners, who had spent all his life as a professional baseball player. “I’ve been thinking about it since spring training. (Retirement) was an easy decision, because I love my family as much as baseball,” says Seger.

Although Seger has been offered by several teams, he remains willing to return to his family. “My mind was set before the end of the season. Lockouts and various uncertainties aren’t good for the ball world, but it doesn’t matter to my decision. I decided to retire earlier.” He clearly denied that lockout influenced his decision to retire. Seger decides to take off his uniform at the young age of 34 for his family. He has scored more than 20 home runs in the season nine times in his 11-year major career with the Mariners, which is a team tie record alongside Ken Griffey Jr.

Romine retires from active duty; achieved 9 positions per game in September 2017

Andrew Romine, the final achiever of nine positions in a game, has announced on his Instagram that he will retire from active duty this season. Romine participated in the Twins game on September 30, 2017 with “7th left wing”, 2nd in the middle, 3rd in the right wing, 4th in the 3rd base, 5th in the game, 6th in the second base. In the 7th inning, he played with a catcher and 2nd base, and in the 8th inning, he defended a pitcher and 1st base. Also, when he pitched in the fielder in August this year, he realized a brother battery with his younger brother Austin.

Romine, now 35, said, “I was a boy with a dream. It was a dream of something great. I want to work harder, get better and compete with the best people in the world. I had a dream of becoming a part of history. When I put down my baseball equipment and looked back on my journey through the baseball, I could only think of the word “Thank you”. ” Instagram posts included words of gratitude to fans and teammates, opponents and trainers, directors and coaches, team staff, front offices, media, stadium staff, and family.

Romine made his major debut in the Angels in 2010, and has been active as a utility player in the Tigers for four years from 2014. After playing for the Mariners in 2018, he played for the Rangers last season and the Cubs this season, although he didn’t play in the majors in 2019. He has participated in 609 games in total in 11 major years, with 294 hits, batting average .233, 11 home runs, 86 RBIs, 40 stolen bases, and OPS.587. The name was firmly engraved in the history of majors.

In addition to Romine, only four people, Bert Campaneris in 1965, Cesar Tober in 1968, Scott Sheldon in 2000, and Shane Halter in 2000, achieved 9 positions in one game. In addition, his brother Battery, which he achieved in the match against Brewers in August this year, was the 16th major record in 59 years since the Sherry brothers in 1962.